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Captioning Educational Videos

Captioning of educational materials is crucial for students with hearing loss. Despite the requirements that students with disabilities be provided equal access to education, the majority of video content shown in classrooms in America is shown without captioning.

What many don’t realize is that all students benefit from captioned material. Literacy rates improve with captioning.

Essential for Learning is a very good informational video that was produced and captioned by Media Access Australia.  Check it out.  No matter where you live, captioning improves comprehension, provides access and increases literacy of students.

Here are a few articles and studies on improving literacy with captioning:

http://jdsde.oxfordjournals.org/content/6/1/43.short
http://www.captionsforliteracy.org/research_on_captions.htm
http://aperfectplayroom.com/?p=791

To learn more about pricing and captioning for educational videos or other content, contact me at tenglish@realtimetranscription.com or contact another reputable captioning company.

Captioning Issues with Video Players

There are many different online media players in use on the internet, and most of them don’t handle captioning well. Here’s an excellent post by Jamie Berke, a well-known hearing loss advocate, and a link to the new SMTPE standards.
http://www.webseriesnetwork.com/forum/topics/ladies-and-gentlemen-update?page=1&commentId=2884614%3AComment%3A79750&x=1#2884614Comment79750

iPad Intro CC – Google Auto Captions vs. Transendia Captions

Apple recently unveiled the revolutionary iPad device and, of course, posted the video on YouTube.  Since YouTube uses Google’s automatic captioning, the video must be accessible for anyone with hearing loss…right?

You be the judge.

Since getting YouTube’s captions to show up on the video can be a bit tricky, we decided to make it easy for you.  We took a video that was recorded with the automatic machine-generated captions by Google being displayed on the screen.  (They appear in the black box inside the video.)  Then we captioned the video using Transendia.  (The Transendia captions appear beneath the video.)  This allows you to compare the two captioning methods head to head.

iPad Intro video – Google vs Transendia

So, what do you think?  We are interested in hearing your thoughts.

Go ahead and search around in the video using the transcript window on the left.  The help file will show you all the features of the player.  If you’d like to know more about Transendia and how you can use our searchable captions, let us know either here or by reaching us through the Contact Us page.

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